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Indian Education Program

Indian Education ProgramStudent

About the Program
The Title VII Indian Education Program is designed to serve the academic and cultural needs of our American Indian student population.  The program is federally funded through the Department of Education – Office of Indian Education.  A grant application is submitted annually for funds that are available to benefit Native youth.  Title VII has functioned in the Bay City Public School District for over 30 years. 

Who is eligible for the program?
Any student enrolled in the Bay City Public School district who meets the Office of Indian Education’s definition of “Indian” is eligible for services from Title VII.  Definition:  Indian means any individual who is a (1) member of an Indian tribe or band, including those Indian tribe or bands terminated since 1940, and those recognized by the State in which the tribe or band reside; or (2) a descendent in the first or second degree (parent or grandparent) as described in (1); or (3) considered by the Secretary of Interior to be an Indian for any purpose; or (4) an Eskimo or Aleut or other Alaska Native; or (5) a member of an organized Indian group that received a grant under the Indian Education Act of 1988 as it was in effect October 19, 1994. Contact us at 989-667-4015 for an enrollment form or for more information.

After School Programs

The Monday After School Program  from 2:30 until 4:30 pm is for grades 6 through 12. The Wednesday After School Program from 2:30 until 5:00 pm is for all grades K-12.  Both programs focus on homework, tutorial assistance, reading and writing.  These study groups provide an excellent opportunity for students to catch up on homework, get help where they may be struggling, meet with other students and make new friends.

The Title VII Indian Education Program is unique in addressing both the academic and cultural needs of our American Indian students. 

To address those needs, the Indian Education Program provides opportunities for Native students:

Wednesdays at the Turtle Shell provide

• Classes in the Ojibwe Language 
• Msko Mikan Nagamojik, the Red  Road Singers, meet monthly to sing and drum and learn the importance and significance of the drum. 
• Cultural awareness classes providing instruction on American Indian subjects.  These classes include history and culture of North American tribes.  Each class includes a craft project – from dream catchers to finger weavings.

More cultural activities include:

• Field trips to area cultural events, museums and historical sites and powwows.  Field trips might include a trip to the Grand Rapids museum for a powwow in November,  a  trip to the Petroglyphs, Seventh Generation Elijah Elk Center, Ziibiiwing Center, Nokomis Cultural Center . 
• Saturday morning workshops for drums, quillwork, beadwork, and regalia 
• Medicine Wheel garden containing the four medicines of the Ojbiwe is planted, tended and harvested each year and the medicines shared with the Bay County Museum and our Indian Education students. 
• Hosting Indian Education Culture Day providing hands-on experiences for classrooms in our district.  Indian Education students host of day of drumming, dancing, crafts, language bingo, wigwam re-enactment, craft demonstrations, storytelling and  culture by knowledgeable Native presenters for over 400 students of the Bay City Schools. 

Cultural Services:
The Title VII Indian Education Program is unique in addressing both the academic and cultural needs of our American Indian students.  

To address those needs, the Indian Education Program provides opportunities for Native students: Wednesdays at the Turtle Shell provide

• Classes in the Ojibwe Language
• Msko Mikan Nagamojik, the Red  Road Singers, meet monthly to sing and drum and learn the importance and significance of the drum.
• Cultural awareness classes providing instruction on American Indian subjects.  These classes include history and culture of North American tribes.  Each class includes a craft project – from dream catchers to finger weavings.
• Field trips to area cultural events, museums and historical sites and powwows.  Field trips might include a trip to the Grand Rapids museum for a powwow in November, a trip to the Petroglyphs, Seventh Generation Elijah Elk Center, Ziibiiwing Center, Nokomis Cultural Center .
• Saturday morning workshops for drums, quillwork, beadwork, and regalia
• Medicine Wheel garden containing the four medicines of the Ojbiwe is planted, tended and harvested each year and the medicines shared with the Bay County Museum and our Indian Education students.
• Hosting Indian Education Culture Day providing hands-on experiences for classrooms in our district.  Indian Education students host of day of drumming, dancing, crafts, language bingo, wigwam re-enactment, craft demonstrations, storytelling and culture by knowledgeable Native presenters for over 400 students of the Bay City Schools.

Other Services:
Family gatherings are held in the fall and the spring

• The Noodin, our newsletter, contains announcements of program opportunities, highlights of our students and school district events 
• A lending library with over 1000 books, cd’s, dvd’s, containing  non-fiction, fiction, reference, culture, environmental issues, political issues  is open to all 
• “Stay In Step Up” targets our 9th and 10th graders to increase attendance.  Students qualifying by having stellar attendance earn a gift each month. 
• A strong component of the Indian Education Program is parent involvement.  A Parent committee meets monthly to shape and direct the program.  The meetings are open to the public and held monthly at the Indian Education Room at the McKinley Center. 
• In order to increase awareness of the American Indian, the Indian Education Program offers classroom presentations to all classrooms in the district on the history and culture and current issues of the American Indian. 
• School supplies are kept on hand and provided free to charge to any enrolled Indian Education student •Indian Education staff attends parent teacher conferences at  several schools each year which are announced in the newsletters.  We also host Parent Teacher conferences at McKinley Center once each semester. 
• Community involvement – The Indian Education Programs partners with other community organizations to promote youth, education, diversity and reading.  Those organizations include Literacy Council of Bay County, Unity Picnic, River of Time, Trombley House, Bay County Historical Museum, Bay County Libraries



 

Indian Education Program
McKinley Center
407 West Ohio
Bay City, MI  48706
Phone:  989-667-4015
Fax: 989-667-4015

Program Administration:
Sandi Dezelah, Program Manager
Gerry Davis, Program Assistant